The new government guided people and their money without much grief for decades; besides a few protests due to high taxes there were never any problems. As time went on and terrorism started to rear it's ugly head more often, however, the government grew more and more wary of it's people and conspiracies started to echo through the old halls where they met to discuss issues. Some of the leaders had a theory that the terrorism was a way of scaring them into backing down and was the first rung in the ladder that would lead to their downfall. To the great annoyance of the people, a movement was passed which allowed government agents to access any private emails, texts, phone calls or internet browsing sessions that they wanted to. Although they found nothing about the coming revolution that they had predicted, they found plenty of content which suggested that the people were growing tired of the governments prying. This only made the leaders more paranoid as they wondered what everyone had to hide and why they disliked the breach of privacy so much. As paranoia grew, so too did the number of security cameras, crippling regulations, defences and the taxes that had to pay for them. Eventually, people started to revolt which only made things worse. As a statement to the people, so that they may recognise that the governemnt had full control over The City and everything within it, they split all of the classes apart and built individual districts to permanently divide them. The wealthier people were allowed to stay in the higher districts next to the government whilst the poorer people were sent to the bottom to perform gruelling labour. With the increase in taxes and the drop in wages, the government focused their new money on the advancement of technology.


This was the time that people started to flow out of The City's ditricts and into Milgrief, where the old dump was transformed into the base for the government's ultimate enemies: the Revolutionaries

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